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Art at the barn

ART AT THE BARN

On Sunday May 30th the Trust is very excited to welcome several local artists to showcase their work in the atmosperic environment of Landbeach tithe barn. The exhibition is free to everyone and runs between 11.00 and 4.00 (https://tithebarntrust.org.uk/learning/2021-events/). The artists are profiled below. All are members of, or associated with, the Cambridge Drawing Society.

The Society is believed to be one of the oldest of its kind in the UK, having been founded in 1882. Throughout its long history the society has fostered the aims of its founding members, “To encourage the arts of drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture in Cambridge and district and to promote exhibitions of members’ work”.  The Society currently has 180 members, both amateur and professional artists. 

Exhibiting Artists

Maureen Mace (Painter & Print-maker / Cambridge)

Maureen’s paintings are about colour, detail and ideas. They tell stories that can be magical and surreal. Cambridge is her home and a huge influence on her work. She loves the beautiful, historic city with its wide, open spaces, great architectural buildings, old university traditions and, of course, its cows. Maureen adds into her works rich night skies and shining moons. Her taste for Medieval manuscripts and tapestries forms the basis for these intricate, dream-like paintings.

https://www.maureenmace.co.uk

http://www.instagram.com/maureenmaceart

Tracey Ashman (Printmaker / Cottenham) – I have practiced printmaking for a decade and as a printmaker, my creativity is limitless. Printmaking processes and techniques can be combined, which provides an endless artistic journey, practising an art form that constantly inspires. My preferred printmaking techniques are mono-printing, silkscreen and linocuts.  
I’m inspired by form, line, colour and texture, and my prints are informed by a fascination with nature, both home and abroad.  My recent print projects have been inspired by an abiding interest in textiles, which comes from my childhood legacy left to me by my mother. I spent many hours in her sewing room, where I was taught to sew and knit at the age of five. I have begun to incorporate stitch into my printmaking processes; the texture and form of stitch, both hand and machine, creates beautiful, unexpected marks. Cotton is now my prefered drawing medium to create line and texture in my prints, and paper is the perfect medium for capturing the beauty of the mark. 

Ann Biggs (Painter & Illustrator / Haddenham) – I trained in the 1970’s and worked as a professional illustrator ever since.  I have worked with educational publishers specialising in Natural History for schools, also taking on commissioned work with private customers. 

Nowadays I take on private commissions, as well as running workshops for various art groups and Haddenham Arts Centre. I focus on subjects such portraits of pets, children, people’s houses as well as my first love, painting wildlife of all shapes and sizes. 

I work from a studio at Haddenham Arts Centre near Ely, Cambs and welcome visitors to my studio where I sell cards, prints and original paintings. 

Rob Ellis (Painter / Cottenham) – I am a figurative painter and I paint rather precisely using transparent watercolours – “pure watercolour”.  I like to mix my paints on a palette and to decide exactly where and how to put them on the paper to achieve my aims.  I first learned the trick of drawing what I could see around me during school holidays some sixty years ago but after that I never studied art and very rarely drew or painted anything. Then, in 2017, I started painting and drawing seriously and have devoted considerable time to it over the last few years. I am particularly interested in working out how best to replicate different textures and the effect of light on them.  I see each new painting as a technical challenge rather than an expression of my passions.  

Iona Howard (Printmaker / Cottenham) – My prints use figuration and abstraction to portray the landscape of places I know well. The sources can come from working en plein air or expressing landscape filtered through memory. The physicality of my approach to the printing process combined with a contemplative exploration of surface makes the subject spontaneous and vibrant whilst capturing an intimate connection with the landscape.  


I have lived on the Fen Edge near Cambridge for the last twenty years and the focus of my work is the meeting point of land, horizon and sky, their flatness altering the perception of distance. My prints have gradually evolved from monochromatic studies by introducing colour to reflect the Fens’ ever-changing mood and light.  

My monochromatic work has developed in parallel to this as a result of my three-year collaboration with the 2017 Fenland Poet Laureate, Kate Caoimhe Arthur. Our work explores the concept of the sublime, the senses of home and alienation in a humanly fabricated natural space, and the precarious relationship between the ecological and the human. From these early walks in the spring of 2017, our collaboration has since taken a variety of forms: staging talks and exhibitions, sound recording and creating numerous prints and poems.  

Christine Lockwood (Painter / Fen Drayton) – Ever since I can remember I have always loved messing about with paints.


I live in the small village of Fen Drayton in Cambridgeshire, working in a lovely light sunny studio where I can concentrate on my love of watercolour painting. I have a passion for colour, the luminosity & vibrancy is reflected in my work. I love to let the colours blend & mix together on the watercolour paper giving that element of surprise & looseness.

Flowers have always been inspirational for me. You will often find me with a sketchpad and camera in the garden on bright sunny days capturing the vibrant petals of the Delphiniums & Hollyhocks or the bees on the Echinacea. These are the perfect subject matter for my paintings. I also enjoy painting landscapes, particularly around the nature reserve where I live and trips to Cornwall, Scotland, Wales & France have all provided me with a wealth of inspiration for me to explore, sketch and paint.

http://www.instagram.com/maureenmaceart

Rita Morton (Printmaker / Bourn) –
 My work spans drawing, illustration and printmaking. On returning to England in 2009, I revived my printmaking skills, primarily through lino and silkscreen. My art derives from my sense of place, predominantly where the man-made harmonises with the natural environment. I am inspired by the imagery, techniques and colours of Japanese prints, especially in a favourite subject of mine, water reflections.

Giulia Quaresima (Painter / Fen Ditton) – Giulia Quaresima is an Italian figurative artist and portrait painter.

The women’s universe is the main theme of her painting season: the relentless passage of time, the laceration of abandonment, the fascinating moment of conception are the subjects on which she reflects. She uses painting to analyse our fears and hopes, and her works do not hide behind intellectual games. The artist believes that her works can show her love for tradition and her respect for the craft, because, in her opinion, modernity should be find through the old rule of art. She is very faithful to the “poetic of realism” with which she carries on her own idea of reality.

Paul Rodhouse (Painter / Burwell) – As a youngster, I was fascinated by both art and natural history and followed a career in biological oceanography.  More than 30 years on, inspired by a visit to the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut, I dug out the brushes and palette of my school days and started painting again.   

I largely use oils and I mostly paint marine and polar subjects, the wildlife, the seascapes and icescapes that have been such an important part of my life.  Starting to paint again was a challenge, but the possibility of having work accepted by the Cambridge Drawing Society provided an incentive.  Becoming a member has encouraged me to develop my skills and artistic imagination. 

Alice Thomson (Multimedia Artist / Girton) – My work has developed as ‘reportage’ drawing directly and spontaneously from life. I  carry a sketchbook and camera constantly with me, and I aim to capture a place and its essence. I use effortless but sensitive use of line, mark making and color with an expressive quality.

Experimenting with different techniques and materials with no strict rules, I enjoy looking for new and surprising effects. I work in a combination of collage, ink, printing, crayons and paints, (gouache oil and acrilic) sticks and pencils to add layers to add interest to my compositions until it feels complete. My work speaks of the sense of places.

Covid dreams

‘Covid Dreams’ is a fully immersive audio and visual art installation at the Tithe Barn, this June, by artists Pain and Gayer-Anderson.

Two local artists reflect on a year of siege from the intangible, a landscape where you cannot save yourself but you can save others.

Gideon Pain’s work plays on the mundane and every day that we slip through on our way to somewhere else. It is about collective moments, some tragic and some euphoric, when the sharing of an experience gives significance to something unnoticed.

Theo Gayer-Anderson has been exploring dystopia in a series of installations for many years and now finds present day events eclipsing his own visions of the future.

All set within the unique grade II listed, timber-frame Tithe Barn. The temporary installation will be free for the public to view on Saturday 12th, Sunday 13th, Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th June. Booking essential.
Book your free timed tickets today at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/tithe-barn-trust-27492103979

What’s next for the tithe barn?

Now that the barn has undergone its urgent repairs, the Trust are turning their attention to fundraising for the second phase of the project to bring waterless eco toilets to the site. We know that this will be a real enabler in terms of future community use and sustainability of the Barn.

Spend a penny
If you spent a penny in the year 1500 (when Henry 7th was king) you’d be spending over £5 today, so we would love it if you would donate at least £5 to the ‘Spend a Penny’ campaign that will enable us to install the high quality environmentally-friendly loos that the Tithe Barn needs to make it an even better place to visit, hire and enjoy. The more you can contribute, the sooner we can have these wonderful facilities in use. You can donate right now on our Total Giving page: https://www.totalgiving.co.uk/appeal/TitheBarnTrust_spendapenny


What’s a Kazubaloo?
The Kazubaloo is an alternative to a composting toilet which doesn’t require any water, electricity or chemicals. They are self-contained, low maintenance and are suitable for high capacity use, which makes them ideal for the Barn and its future uses.

How many are you hoping to install?
Our aim is to install 2 toilets to provide the capacity required for the barn.

Where are they going?
Our new toilets will be installed along the path to the barn, near the oak tree. The system used in the toilets require specific site conditions and we felt that this location is best for both the toilets and to protect the setting of the Tithe Barn.

Are they accessible?
The Kazubaloo is very similar to a standard toilet. The model we are proposing to install is fully accessible.

How do they work?
The toilets primarily operate using solar and wind energy. Solids and liquids are separated through the use a basket which catches the solid waste and allows liquids to drain away into a tank below. The chimney at the back of the Kazubaloo is warmed by the sun, causing the air inside to also heat up, which then rises. At the top of the chimney is an extractor which will rotate in the breeze. The combination of the extractor and the warm air intensifies the airflow through the unit. Fresh air is drawn down through the toilet pan which stops any odours from escaping. The constant airflow through the toilet dehydrates the waste, reducing it by up to 90%.


When will they be installed?
This will be subject to raising the required funds and achieving planning consent.

How much will they cost?
We are hoping to raise £30,000 through our “Spend a Penny” campaign which will cover the costs of the toilets and their installation.

Does it smell?
Not at all. The key is the separation of the liquids and solids and the airflow. By separating the waste inside the Kazubaloo System and ensuring that a near continuous flow of air passes over the separated waste the system is designed to ensure that decomposition is an aerobic process. The products of aerobic decomposition are odourless and non-toxic.


What happens to the waste material when it’s cleaned out of the toilet?
The dried waste is removed from the toilet in a basket, having spent roughly a year in the system drying out. The inert and odourless dry waste is transferred in the baskets, using the precaution of gloves, into a secondary composting process to allow the waste to be composted fully. This generally takes the form of a compost bin dedicated to the waste. However, the reality is, that the compost bin will fill up very slowly and therefore will not need emptying for a considerable time.

What if there is no sun or wind?
A waterless toilet provides advantageous conditions for evaporation and it is extremely rare that zero evaporation will occur. In any event, if there is waste in the system, then microbiological activity will continue and the waste will continue to break down. If a period of prolonged darkness and lack of wind occurred and waste was continually added to the system, then they would need to be manually emptied, but it’s somewhat unlikely.

Do they work in cold wet climates?
Waterless toilets do work in cold wet climates, the amount of usage a toilet gets should be matched to the climate. In colder climates the toilets should be used less and in warmer climates the usage can be increased.

What about toilet paper?
This will break down alongside the human waste.

What happens if people throw rubbish into the toilet?
Nothing. The Kazubaloo will continue to function as normal in spite of drinks cans, sanitary towels, plastic cutlery, nappies and so on being thrown into the system. They will be retrieved at the end of the cycle and disposed of in the normal way. However, we would rather people didn’t use our new toilets as a bin and use the bins that will be provided, or take it home.


How is it maintained?
After an initial assessment of use, aside from the usual cleaning, the toilets will only require maintenance once or twice a year, depending on usage. “Emptying” the toilets would usually only be a five minute job.

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